Creating the Right Culture: Shifting from Boss to Leader


In the 7th season of “The Office”, Dwight Schrute acts as the newly appointed Regional Manager of the Scranton branch of Dunder Mifflin. In true “Dwight” fashion, he displays an overzealous, heavy-handed management style when stepping into his new role. He quickly transforms into an unwanted boss. His position of power and heavy-handedness promptly make him unpopular with the rest of the office. Culture Matters. 

It is vital that managers transition into leaders. It makes good business sense and is a solid investment in the future of your organization. Taking the necessary steps to transform into a leader is not succession, but progression. Personal skill and professional development are key parts for cultivating a successful individual. By stepping into a leadership role over a boss role, you can foster unimaginable growth for your organization.

What does it take to be a leader instead of a boss?

Leaders empower their employees. They engage in discussions that allow space for honest conversation and prompt change. Leaders boost their employees’ confidence. They allow for employees to come to them with issues or questions that they may have. A good leader recognizes the need for feedback, both for affirmation and for growth. Leaders are focused on long-term success while still being present and working towards short-term success.

Construction to Results

When a new employee starts at your organization, it is important that during their onboarding process they are able to see the long-term goals. Long-term goals provide vision and perspective for the future, but they aren’t enough to sustain the health of your organization. As a leader, you should provide your team with short-term goals, so that they are able to create tangible steps to work towards long-term goals. This process is called Construction to Results. It takes short-term goals and fosters long-term results. A boss focuses solely on the long-term and does not take the steps in the present to achieve those results. Think about a house… you can’t put lighting in a home if the electrical work hasn’t been done yet. The finished product is a process that doesn’t happen overnight. It takes time.

Expert to Visionary

Bosses thrive as experts. They know their field or department, and how it must function to thrive. As a leader, this isn’t enough. They are slow to consider themselves experts and are always looking for opportunities to learn and grow in their role while helping others grow in their roles. Leaders are visionaries who challenge and push the organization to reach father and achieve bigger goals than before. Leaders have to channel current trends and forecast future direction. Vision-casting can be complex, but as a leader, your role creates a movement that strives towards one goal. This idea will always be the fundamental aspect that separates a leader from a boss. Leaders are always learning and always casting vision to accomplish one goal as a whole.

From One to All

Bosses oversee the day-to-day operations on the floor. They are in the daily tasks with their employees. Bosses tend to manage, where-as leaders tend to give encouragement and direction. Leaders are one with the team, they get in the trenches with their team and help give direction when needed. Leaders are focused on the overall health of the organization rather than their own self-achievement. Leaders know that each individual contributes to a larger picture, and work to ensure that they cultivate an open-minded shift from managing one department to benefitting the entire organization.

Leaders choose the organization over themselves time and time again. By stepping into a leadership role over a boss role, you will foster unimaginable growth for your organization.

Want to learn more about shifting from a boss mentality to a leadership mentality? vidREACH has you covered.